Doris Grozdanovičová

In January 1942 she and her family were sent from Brno to Terezin, her mother died in the ghetto, her father was killed in Auschwitz; she remained in Terezin until the war was over.

She and her brother are the only survivors in her family.

In Terezin I worked in the agricultural department as a shepherdess. I was later given a flock of 72 sheep. Most days I spent in the meadows, alone with my flock, reading secretly smuggled books, which was forbidden. One day a lamb was born. In the evening I took it back to the stables, and they called it Doriska. dois-grozdanovicova The fact that I could read made up for many things in the ghetto, and I was always wary not to be caught. But one day I was deeply absorbed in a novel by Andre Malraux, titled “Hope”, that I only looked up, shocked, when I saw a shadow. In the book that I was reading a general was going for a ride on his black horse – and there was towering above me on his black horse the much-feared SS-Obersturmführer Rahm. Without a word he turned and left.

In October 1944, when my father was assigned for transportation to the east, I only wanted to stay with him. I was determined and walked through a row of policemen until I got to the SS. I wanted to save my father. Until today I do not understand that the policemen let me pass. Surprised by my daring the SS asked me, “What do you want?” “I want to join the transport with my father, because I would be on my own in Terezin otherwise.” I denied my brother. They replied: “It is so good to be in Terezin.” At that time, they sounded cruel to me, but they saved my life.
This is a moment I cannot forget.

Editor and translator, born April 20, 1926 in Jihlava, divorced, 1 son.

Share this post on...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone
Share this post on...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someone