EJP: Holocaust survivors and other victims of Nazi persecution are still increasingly dependent on social welfare support

25 Jun , ESLI in Media

BRUSSELS (EJP)—Seventy years after the Holocaust,in which 75% of the Jewish population in Europe perished, survivors and other victims of Nazi persecution are still increasingly dependent on social welfare support while facing poverty and ill-health.

Moreover, most properties unlawfully seized from Jews in Central and Eastern Europe have still not been returned to their original owner, to their heirs, or to the Jewish community.

In order to raise awareness and support for this cause and call for bold action, Dutch Member of the European Parliament Bastiaan Belder, Vice-Chair of the Delegation for relations with Israel, organizes Tuesday 23 June in the European Parliament in Brussels a seminar in cooperation with the Claims Conference, the European Shoah Legacy Institute and the European Jewish Community Centre. The seminar will discuss the the results of the recent International Conference on Welfare for Holocaust Survivors and Other Victims of Nazi Persecution.

On this occasion, an exhibition ‚‘‘Living with Dignity” will open in the EU assembly. With this exhibit of photos and short profiles of Jewish Nazi victims, the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (Claims Conference) wishes to highlight a few of the tens of thousands of elderly and frail Jewish victims of Nazism living in Europe who benefit from homecare and other services necessary for daily life, as well as direct compensation payments, provided with funding secured by the Claims Conference.

Each photo will tell the story of each survivor and of the help they receive from the Claims Conference.

The purpose of the database of the survivors is to provide governments, advocacy groups and international institutions important information about the progress of the Terezin Declaration by countries in achieving their commitments to ensure that the social welfare needs of Holocaust survivors and other victims of Nazi persecution are met, and that these individuals are able to live the remainder of their lives with dignity.

 

The article, published by European Jewish Press, can be found here.